Share:

What Role (or Roles) Does Social Media Play in Your Career?  

Page 2 / 2
 

Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 899
August 1, 2019 3:39 pm  
Posted by: TFinn
Posted by: DX

 

I've spoken to several recruiters, but I don't think they are generally very skilled in speaking to the cross suitability of candidates from other areas of the communication world---it's likely just easier to keep people in the industries where they currently work.  

You're absolutely right about headhunters. We are not "career changers" . . .  If you've got a giant gap to close between where you are and where you want to be (a different category of job, ie. moving from Medical Affairs to Business Development) or a giant transition that wouldn't be considered on the same track, you're not going to get there via a recruiter contact. Recruiters will be working on assignments where they need you to take a job that is often a bigger, better job than the one you are in now -- but, it will be "logical" and in line with what you have done, and NOT what you want to do,

Dave

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


ReplyQuote
TFinn
Active Colleague Registered
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 13
August 1, 2019 4:03 pm  
Posted by: DX

Ha ha TFinn, small world!  Yes ha ha maybe the same online  CME provider - if so you aware probably well aware of some fustrations your clients have had.   I did this about 3 years ago now so check the records to see if it’s your company.  But I’ve discussed this past  a few teams and some folks in other companies and many shared my experiences on getting metrics.  Well we question the impact of this specific provider on our impact map.  Aye aye won’t discuss further. 

On the European side where I am CME is a bit fragmented to say best certainly nowhere near where the US as one country is - different companies have different policies to how the support education via varied   CME outlets (including universities), my last company was quiet liberal where as my curent is quiet restricted - being in Global and being ex US one can find oneself explaining the merits of CME providers/channels - fear of lost of control of communication messages is one recurring issue for the misinformed teams. or those with poor KOL relationships, you do find Medical Directors in the Pharma with very poor relationship compencies amazingly enough c’est la vie. 

You can make a leap of course, your in a communications role I would say so leverage your strengths there. In the US CME can be part of a isolated/independent corporate function often linked to grants administration. Try there.  Or look for Medical Communications roles where at first Publications Management is not in scope for the job role and responsibilities as that has some technical intricate details that need to be learned if you were to progress there.  Or good old MSL route to get your customer facing box checked.  You are right recruiters in general are not very good in my experience with cross function or sector jumps. They are too focus finding a person with the exact same profile for the job.  Sooooo.....Try networking directly with those who are in the role you want.  

As you say you like where you are the n that good! Plenty of good things to be done on your side and certainly a nice spot to land for science careers.  And seriously enjoy it!  If you have no pressure to go and you’re developing - camp out for a bit.

DX

 

NB to the edit:  also for your career and you expertises , if if the biggest fails I have seen, if you come to Global or International is thinking US CME views and practices apply ex-US.  That goes for a lot of things US but don’t make that mistake - in my last company we had a new Global Med Ed function, got a US CME expert and well that person was a fail, couldn’t get thier US mindset modified.  They didn’t last long.  

 

 

 

Given the realities of where we both work, we can't really get into specifics. However, the complaints I've heard about our company are not at all in line with your experiences, so I'm not quite sure of your specific frustrations.  I will say, I've specifically dealt with supporters who are unhappy with something we've done, and we've always done our best to make it right. I'd love to know more as such information is always helpful moving forward.  Unless something is a complete disaster, I will not always hear about it.  One of things I like about my current job is that I get to specialize somewhat in the disease states in which I work---and it keeps me in the same general area as my PhD major (and sometimes even close to what my research was on).  

I'm definitely open to a few different ways in the door, though I don't want to work for an agency (my wife does this).  I'd rather stay where I am in that case.  To your point, there definitely are positions within CME departments in pharma, but I wonder if I'd be satisfied there.  I tend to think I'd get bored fairly quickly---and then you have pesky people like my colleagues and competitors looking for some of your time at meetings.  I like the content and science stuff---not many in the CME departments really know the science that well.  They're more interested in metrics, which can sometimes be pretty interesting, but most of the time (at the level I've seen then discussed) is pretty dull.  An MSL position would actually be a pretty good fit given that my current job role, among other things, requires me to develop relationships with KOLs. The objectives of my conversations and an MSL are different, but there are certainly some transferable skills.  It's really one of those things where I need one person to see what I see and be willing to give me a shot.  I've always been of the opinion that there is someone out there interesting in giving people a shot.  I just gotta find that person.   

 


ReplyQuote
TFinn
Active Colleague Registered
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 13
August 1, 2019 4:15 pm  
Posted by: Dave Jensen

f you've got a giant gap to close between where you are and where you want to be (a different category of job, ie. moving from Medical Affairs to Business Development) or a giant transition that wouldn't be considered on the same track, you're not going to get there via a recruiter contact. Recruiters will be working on assignments where they need you to take a job that is often a bigger, better job than the one you are in now -- but, it will be "logical" and in line with what you have done, and NOT what you want to do,

Dave

Hi Dave, 

Yes, I have found that out the hard way.  Linked In can be such a weird place.  I get people reaching out for Medical Director positions in Pharma that require an MD or regulatory writing positions.  It's clear that some people see a couple of random things in my profile, but don't actually read it.  Yes, I went to a university medical school for my graduate education, but my degree is a PhD, which is in my profile!  So you get those folks. 

Sometimes people will reach out with intriguing offers from other areas.  An in-house recruiter from Merck reached out to me and recently, a recruiter at a search firm approached me about an MSL position at a new(er) company.  They all seemed like interesting positions I would consider, but they didn't go anywhere.  I have the CME recruiters reaching out to me and like you mentioned above, many have VP positions for me.  I've never really been interested in "running the show" in CME. 

To your point, it may require more work on my part to get in the door somewhere.  At this point in time however, I'm not in a position to put in the extra effort. So right now, I'm happy to talk to people.  And honestly, having someone as a sounding board is helping me craft my story.  I'll see how things shake out over the next 1-2 yrs.   


ReplyQuote
DX
Honorable Maven Registered
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 580
August 1, 2019 4:29 pm  

Ha ha yes if your’re in a pure content generating role with no business development responsibility and/or billable hour work life then enjoy it !

early in my career I was on the agency side , very short time and my wife worked in management consulting - we are both in Pharma and like where we are.  Yes we both get them folk looking for our time etc etc , nature of the business.  Many DO like the agency life, there can be good career paths and experiences.  Certainly we both benefitted. 

DX

 

 

 

 


ReplyQuote
TFinn
Active Colleague Registered
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 13
August 1, 2019 6:07 pm  
Posted by: DX

Ha ha yes if your’re in a pure content generating role with no business development responsibility and/or billable hour work life then enjoy it !

early in my career I was on the agency side , very short time and my wife worked in management consulting - we are both in Pharma and like where we are.  Yes we both get them folk looking for our time etc etc , nature of the business.  Many DO like the agency life, there can be good career paths and experiences.  Certainly we both benefitted. 

DX

 

 

 

 

My role is basically like an internal consultant.  I touch revenue and content, so I see a lot of the internals working in the TA in which I am involved.  Nothing wrong with agency work at all---these companies exist for a reason.  I just feel that more interesting work goes on inside of industry versus the companies that support it.  I've seen and done a lot in the time I've been on the vendor side and I have zero regrets.  But my goal isn't merely to move up just to get the title/recognition, but to try new things, if that makes sense.  Or at least, find an area that makes me want to move up.  But I've never been in a position in my career where I've ever wanted my boss's position. 

This post was modified 3 weeks ago by TFinn

ReplyQuote
DX
Honorable Maven Registered
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 580
August 2, 2019 1:25 pm  
Posted by: TFinn
Posted by: DX

Ha ha yes if your’re in a pure content generating role with no business development responsibility and/or billable hour work life then enjoy it !

early in my career I was on the agency side , very short time and my wife worked in management consulting - we are both in Pharma and like where we are.  Yes we both get them folk looking for our time etc etc , nature of the business.  Many DO like the agency life, there can be good career paths and experiences.  Certainly we both benefitted. 

DX

 

 

 

 

My role is basically like an internal consultant.  I touch revenue and content, so I see a lot of the internals working in the TA in which I am involved.  Nothing wrong with agency work at all---these companies exist for a reason.  I just feel that more interesting work goes on inside of industry versus the companies that support it.  I've seen and done a lot in the time I've been on the vendor side and I have zero regrets.  But my goal isn't merely to move up just to get the title/recognition, but to try new things, if that makes sense.  Or at least, find an area that makes me want to move up.  But I've never been in a position in my career where I've ever wanted my boss's position. 

For me it’s been a combination of both.  Doing things find interesting and certainly moving up in title/responsibility.  I knew as an MSL that I had some interest in being on a Medical Director track, I was close, and still am, close to my first US Medical Director for the Therapeutic Area I was in.  Other forces put me Overseas and in “Global” -  in my careers track I had interest on the commercial side from a hands on perspective  and well got to do that as well / I am still very commercial and that works well to be a successful Med Aff person.

As for being internal yes agree I choose Pharma with an overarching goal of Learning and being part of the drug development process - and as that’s firmly a commercially driven process, being in a Pharma made sense.  I think I can check the box on that goal pretty well, sitting and leading a cross-functional brand team and being a part of development teams all working cross-functional - that cant be had on on agency side.  And yes I’m biased but being in Medical and Marketing gives that view nicely.  I thought about being in Pricing and Market Access as I do work hand in hand with that function but I’m happy supporting the from Medical ..all linked to the Brand plan and franchise direction right? 

I don’t want to go higher my boss is GMA Franchise Head, VP level, thank you but no thank you - I already sat on a Leadership Team where the CEO would show up, I’ll pass. I already deal with a lot of polictics ... yuck. I’m good where I am.  No further I will I go. Sit for 7 to 8 years - no harm. Start my own business in that time.  Nothing Pharma related. 

Dx


ReplyQuote
MA
New Colleague Registered
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 1
August 3, 2019 7:56 pm  

I am an academic (associate professor) and I use Twitter extensively to promote the work of my lab, network, and learn about most recent work in my broad area of interest (Twitter + email alerts from journals and preprint servers are my two main sources of info, and Twitter is usually better). I also tend to try to spread the word (and compliment) work of others that looks interesting or exciting, and I have heard positive things about this approach from other scientists. In my experience, being positive and friendly on social media helps in attracting new connections, including potential collaborators.

I use LinkedIn to keep track of former students and colleagues but have heard from many academics that they don't find LinkedIn useful at all.

While IP does not feature as prominently in my work as in industry, I do try to be mindful of not disclosing any unpublished data (both my own and that presented or discussed by other scientists). I always think twice before posting something on Twitter to be sure it will not reflect negatively on me or my employer.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by MA

ReplyQuote
Dick Woodward
Reputable Colleague Registered
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 268
August 3, 2019 8:12 pm  

MA -

Being positive and friendly on anything (not just social media) helps in attracting new connections and collaborators! That said, I find your use of Twitter quite interesting, and apparently it is paying off for you.

Have you (and your graduate students and postdocs, if you have any) had training from the institution as to what you can and cannot post on social media relative to intellectual property (inventions, unpublished ideas, results)? Obviously, anything published is OK, but has there been training on how to handle unpublished data? Coming from industry where IP is critical, and having brought several companies out of academic institutions, I have noticed that academia has a somewhat more cavalier attitude about IP. I am curious how your institution deals with that.

Dick


ReplyQuote
Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 899
August 4, 2019 1:31 am  
Posted by: MA

I use LinkedIn to keep track of former students and colleagues but have heard from many academics that they don't find LinkedIn useful at all.

 

I mention in another thread how important LinkedIn is to professional recruitment companies. And yes -- headhunters are indeed retained by Universities to find senior staff, sometimes full professors but primarily leadership positions. There's reason enough to have a LinkedIn profile. You don't need to be updating it every month or do anything other than making sure you are visible there with your area of specialty. People will find you and you'll occasionally hear about something that could be of interest to you, a position that wasn't broadcast through your network but which is bubbling up due to retained search by a search firm,

Dave

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2