What other options are available if I have a PhD in the sciences but do not wish to work at the laboratory bench?  

 

Colleague 45567
New Colleague Registered
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 1
January 8, 2019 5:44 pm  

What other options are available if I have a PhD in the sciences but do not wish to work at the laboratory bench?


ReplyQuote
Dave Jensen
Eminent Colleague Moderator
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 34
January 8, 2019 5:45 pm  

There are numerous other possibilities for careers outside the laboratory.

Management consulting firms hire individuals with PhDs to work alongside their MBA consultants. The firms offer significant introductory training and professional development opportunities. The recruiting season for the large consulting companies is based on the academic calendar, with application deadlines in early fall, interviews in late fall/winter, the extension of offers in winter, and start dates in the spring and summer. Those interested in management consulting should look into McKinsey's Insight Healthcare program. Intended for candidates with MD or PhD degrees, these provide an all-expenses-paid weekend retreat. Candidates are given extensive information about consulting careers and perform a simulated case that illustrates the typical tasks required of a management consultant.

Medical Science Liaisons (MSLs) work at pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies and act as intermediaries between the technical departments and the marketing/sales departments. They also represent the company in interactions with external scientists or physicians. Application Scientists are those who work for supplier companies such as reagent or instrument firms. The Application Scientist supports the work of the sales rep, assisting them in technical communications to their customer, as well as seminars and workshops.

Technology transfer is a mixture of business, science, and law, and people enter the field from all three directions. Networking is especially important in finding these positions. AUTM (Association of University Technology Managers) is a professional organization for technology transfer professionals, with an annual meeting, regional meetings, and educational programs.

Many people with advanced degrees in the sciences work in science policy. Several policy fellowships are available, and are a good way to transition from research to policy. The best known fellowships may be those offered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

- Dave Jensen, Moderator and Founder

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


ReplyQuote
Colleague 45120
New Colleague Registered
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 1
January 8, 2019 5:46 pm  

Other career possibilities include teaching, entrepreneurship, regulatory affairs, quality assurance, biomanufacturing, working for not-for-profit organizations, grants administration, museum exhibit development and so on. There are many different options, but as said in the earlier post, sometimes you start out your career in research and then, once gainfully employed, you move from there.


ReplyQuote
Colleague 45198
New Colleague Registered
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 1
January 8, 2019 5:46 pm  

No one has as of yet mentioned that many former research scientists work as science or medical writers or editors. Writing and editing positions are found in many different settings, including pharmaceutical companies, professional societies (American Heart Association), marketing and public relations companies, and contract research organizations. Advertising agencies also hire writers to develop sales aids or training materials for pharmaceutical sales staff. Other possible work settings include textbook publishers, scientific journals, and science-oriented publications in the lay media (National Geographic, Scientific American). Most major medical schools have public press offices, and many have offices of continuing medical education.

In addition to a solid science background, any kind of writing experience would be helpful in making the transition to one of these positions. Scientific manuscripts, abstracts, or grant proposals might be sufficient for an entry-level position. Project management and leadership are important skills . . . writers in the corporate environment are often required to produce documents on schedule while working with a diverse team. Other types of helpful experience might include volunteering at a journal edited by a member of your academic department, writing for your local newspaper, or collaborating with a local researcher who needs help preparing manuscripts for publication. The American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) offers courses on writing and editing, medical terminology, interpreting medical research, and related topics, as does the National Association of Science Writers (NASW).


ReplyQuote
Dick Woodward
Active Colleague Registered
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 6
January 8, 2019 7:45 pm  

Sales, marketing and business development in the scientific industry are areas where a PhD is very useful. Not only are they lucrative careers, they are also the fastest way to senior management. Take a look at http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/1997/05/his-mother-cried-when-he-went-sales .  Dave Jensen and I wrote this article over two decades ago, but it is still timely today.

Good luck.

Dick Woodward


ReplyQuote
DX
Active Colleague Registered
Joined: 3 weeks ago
Posts: 12
January 9, 2019 2:32 pm  

One area is Heatlh-Technology Assessment linking to Market Access/Pricing & Reimbursement as well as Heatlh-econ Outomes Research roles. 

Another is Market Research - also entry level ops - into Marketing.

Within Pharma, someone already hinted, but roles within Medical Affairs sub functions beyond an MSL sub-function, to include Medical Communications, Publications Management, Medical Writing, Medical Information, Medical Education and Grants Adminstration etc. and so on.  Some of this accessible via an agency path where one can also grow and find career satisfaction on the agency side. 

Drug Safety is another, analytical, data assessment and collation - key role in ensuring product benefit risk profiles etc.

Reulatory Affairs - esp in dossier generation and labeling is highly scientific. entry level roles here also on agency side.

Another one a bit challenging to access but Project Management - good spot.

Technical /Industrial Operations - this has to with production of the physical asset from a more operational/managment perspective working closely with varied Manufacturing Functions, Drug Supply Chaim Management,QA/QC, Reg Aff. and Commerical functions - good access point to Project Management

Portfolio Management - something can be accessible by research scientist in-house but maybe something to explore.    

Policy. Education. Law Enforcement, Intelligence Community, Military Scientist,  etc etc. etc..


Dave Jensen liked
ReplyQuote
Share: