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Recently tried a different industry but dislike it - how to move back  

 

Colleague 45679
New Colleague Registered
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 1
January 18, 2019 4:28 pm  

Dear all,

I come from the original forum . . . sorry for my strange username here!

I recently made a move to go a different industry (from pharma to government & software department - the reason was it was a good opportunity. I wanted to build up the relationship between the pharma co's and this software provider. I learned the sales side, but I dislike the industry. Things turned out differently and I quite dislike my new job after 5 months!

A) How would you proceed? On my CV my job change makes no sense. If I leave it away it looks like I am unemployed. 

B) Do you think it make sense to stick it out for 1 year or start applying now?

Help please...

This topic was modified 5 months ago by Dave Jensen

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Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 868
January 18, 2019 5:18 pm  

Hello New Colleague, never fear, now that you are registered you can put any username you'd like into it, but please keep it to a name or initials (doesn't have to be your name, but please -- no Abe Lincoln's allowed). Also, while you are adjusting your profile (with the little person icon on your posts) you can add a signature, add an avatar or photo, etc.

With regards to your career move . . . it's perceived as unethical by many people (most) to eliminate jobs on a resume or CV. You can't just drop a period of employment and hope that no one finds out, because someone WILL FIND OUT, and you'll look like you were hiding something (in retrospect, I guess you were).

The best approach is to quietly start networking now. Keep your CV with the full employment information on it, but do not circulate it widely. Stay employed. Do the best you can, but keep your eyes and ears open for a way to get out. Yes, a year or a couple of years would be best if you could do it, but it sounds like that would be impossible. You've made a career mistake -- everyone does this at one time or another! Don't worry about it. But do develop a nice way to talk about the issues you've got there -- do NOT blame it on the company, take the error on yourself, and it's just not a fit for your workstyle and preferred environment, etc.

Recruiter contacts would be good at this time because they can help you make a move when just circulating your CV broadly will just raise more questions,

 

Dave

This post was modified 5 months ago by Dave Jensen

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
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DX
Honorable Maven Registered
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 557
January 22, 2019 10:37 am  

Hi, 

To add on top of what Dave said, something I recommend you do is have clear in your mind

1. why you wanted to change industry in the first place. or what pulled you to your current role

2. why the experience in a short time was not a match to your expectations?  That's linked to have a clear thought on what you found, and why that didnt jive over all.  But also be clear on what you did like (surely there was something).

3. Your motivating reasons to comeback and very important..what did you learn in your current role that you think you can bring back.  Surely being in a different industry you learned something to port.  

Considering all of the above then gives you a clear rationale to talk to.  As Dave mentioned, avoid complaining and bashing the experience, there a few intepretations one can take out of that behavior and one of them is poor change management skills.  So look out for your tone and response attitude as you progress to your shift back.

I had a somewhat different situation than you, I did a lateral shift to a different function, though I stuck it out for nearly 4 years, and returned to my former function, what I did do was talk more to what my learnings were and how I can apply those learnings (i.e. bring value) back to my "home" function.  Obviously there were things I didn't like during those 4 years that contributed to my decision not to advance there and comeback to my original path, but that was not the focus of my discussion.

Best,

DX


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Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 868
January 22, 2019 6:41 pm  

Good points DX . . . The "learnings" question is very important. I have no issues when someone says they've made a career mistake, but if they have no response or a poor response when asked what they got out of that "mistake," it's a real concern.

Dave

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


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