Share:

Millenials in the Workplace  

Page 2 / 2
 

Michael James
Active Colleague Registered
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 5
August 23, 2018 9:58 pm  

We just had a 50+ year old faculty recruit leave within a week, and I can name many more that we have lost in the last 5 years. In contrast, all of the under 40 year old faculty have been deeply committed to the institution. The older generation is just as flaky as the younger generation. I see plenty of mobility when reviewing applications. I don't think any of the comments made in this thread are backed up by data.


ReplyQuote
Mira D
New Colleague Registered
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 3
August 28, 2018 2:57 am  

Instead of feebly finding ways to blame an entire generation for their failings to adhere to norms that many consider oppressive and regressive, perhaps you should turn the mirror around and consider if there's an issue with the policies and procedures these Millenials have to contend with in your workplace. While I would be wary of making my own set of sweeping generalizations about an entire generation, I have found that Baby Boomers, despite their big sacks of confidence (perhaps instilled by living their entire adult lives during peak-capitalism boom times), are inept when it comes to electronic communication (what we Millenials like to call "email"). Perhaps your email correspondence wasn't as crystal clear as you may have thought it was, leading to the new hire not showing up on day 1 of their new job? Maybe men in the office made inappropriate comments to the female employee and that was the underlying reason she felt the need to take time off when it wasn't yet "deserved"?


ReplyQuote
Andrew
Eminent Colleague Registered
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 33
September 13, 2018 5:55 am  

Had another person that we waited for a month to get her EAD card and she was to start next Monday. She sent an email that she continued interviewing and found another job and she won't be showing up.

It is definitely a generational thing and has to do with extreme immaturity and a sense of entitlement that we have never seen in previous generations. It is tempting to behave like them and just continue to interview candidates and make offers until someone starts and then rescind the others, but I will insist on standards of behavior for my company regardless of what I see in the marketplace.

Mira, your comments are ridiculous. There are no "unclear communications" or "comments from men" that required she take a week off without permission and there are no old people here that do not know how to use email. The kid we fired had a female boss and she had only worked there two months. I was willing to make it a warning, but her boss wanted her fired.


ReplyQuote
Andrew
Eminent Colleague Registered
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 33
September 13, 2018 5:13 pm  

A few other points in this thread

- I cannot imagine any recruiter giving a year guarantee these days. We had a 6 month guarantee from the last person we hired via a recruiter and they left after 7 months. $25K cost and we did not do any better than the direct hires.

- Some commented on evolving norms. I'm sorry, but I don't see it. A norm of rudeness toward people and displaying a lack of integrity is what I have described. Is that the norm that you are defending? How old school do you have to be to have an expectation that people will do what they have agreed to do?

- On social media. We are finding that all these young people are connected to one another on Facebook and Wechat. Twenty years ago you could take an employment action and walk the person out the door and control the narrative throughout the company. This is no longer the case. They leave the company and continue to communicate with all the employees. It requires rigorous honesty with all other employees without breaching the affected employee's privacy. Because you are a bit hamstrung due to privacy concerns, it ends up with the ex-employee controlling the internal narrative rather than the company.


ReplyQuote
PG
Reputable Colleague Registered
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 395
September 16, 2018 11:54 am  

One thing is that I dont think that applicants that accepts a position and then doesnt show up for whateer reason understands the costs involved which are significant.

In this example I am going to assume that the person lets me know that he isnt coming the day before starting the new job. When this happens the entire hiring process may have to be restarted since we have said no thanks you to the other top candidates which usually means that they are no longer available.

Around here the typical recruitment process with a candidate that already has another position looks something like the following

Advertise the position.
Wait two weeks for applications to come in, this time includes readong and priortizing applications. Going through all applications, prioritizing etc will take at least 2 full time Days for Company staff.

Perform first round interviews with 2-3 people from the Company, 2 weeks calender time and probably Another two Days in working time.

perform second interciew round with 2-3 other peope often including a more sentior manager and potentially HR etc. Another two week calender time and maybe 1 full day total in working time.

Decide on candidate, send out offer etc. Various administrative work, organizing IT, entry cards etc. Probably Another 2 full Days of working time.

The typical time here for a new hire to start is around three months from when the offer is accepted.

Total time approx 4 months calender time and 7 full time work days including time from managers etc.

7 full time Days will cost us as a Little bit of Money but more importantly I currently typically have 4 people in an early stage Project meaning that losing 4 calender months for one of them is a one month delay to launch. Taking one of the last Projects we started as an example that month will probably cost us slightly above a million US dollars. In addition to that it will cost me as the responsible manager some discussions with top management about why we cant deliver on time and may also cause difficulties with external collaboration partners

Accepting a position and then dropping out last minute creates significant cost and troubles for the Company and it is likely that the hiring manager and potentially several others may remember the name of a candidate that did someting like this which may come back to the candidate in the future.


ReplyQuote
Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 899
September 19, 2018 8:57 pm  

To Andrew . . . With regards to recruiting firm guarantees. I think you may be dealing with contingency recruiting. That's a whole other industry. In retained search, that's the average guarantee (one year).

Dave

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


ReplyQuote
Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 899
September 20, 2018 7:47 pm  

Mira, your comments are ridiculous. There are no "unclear communications" or "comments from men" that required she take a week off without permission and there are no old people here that do not know how to use email. The kid we fired had a female boss and she had only worked there two months. I was willing to make it a warning, but her boss wanted her fired.

Andrew, I debated on whether to remove that post from Mira. I also thought it was ridiculous, but in my years moderating this forum, we've removed very few posts and I'd like that to continue. I wrote her privately asking for no more of that kind of post, and she never replied here or via private email. I think she was a short-timer on the forum.

Dave

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


ReplyQuote
Andrew
Eminent Colleague Registered
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 33
December 19, 2018 7:46 pm  

Ghosting is getting more press

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/news/is-g ... e-4807490/

Some of the commenters disagree with my initial assessment that this is a generational phenomenon. I am changing my mind on that as well. I think now it is more of a trend in US culture towards rudeness, excusing it as merely non-PC (politically correct). It doesn't help that some leaders at the highest level of our government use the same excuse.


ReplyQuote
Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 899
December 26, 2018 10:50 pm  

Thanks Andrew. It's worth noting that anyone who did that to me or to a client of mine would definitely feel the "sting" because references for most recruited jobs are conducted via phone, and not letters. Letters or email references have a lot of staying power, so they can always be interpreted later as a "bad reference." But when you make phone calls to references, it's easy to tell that a reference is not a good one. So easy. You'll be toast if you don't pull off a proper reference!

Dave

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


ReplyQuote
tracymurphy17
New Colleague Registered
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 3
June 11, 2019 3:45 am  

While it's a common presumption that millennials hop from one job to another, I read in an article by Forbes that they aren't the only ones who've done this. The article said, "the Bureau of Labor Statistics states Baby Boomers did just as much job-hopping in their respective 20s as millennials do these days."

While job-hopping may look bad in their CVs, they tend to have higher wages and develop their career on a faster track. Which also makes them adapt faster to their workplaces.

In my opinion, young people will most of the time be job hoppers, regardless of what generation they belong to. And with every job they get is another experience added to their CVs. This does not automatically mean they lack commitment, though. This may mean that the company isn't giving them the room to grow, or at least they think it won't. 

Cheers!

 

 

 

This post was modified 2 months ago by Dave Jensen

ReplyQuote
Dave Jensen
Prominent Maven Moderator
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 899
June 18, 2019 5:46 pm  

No one is picking on millennials -- there have always been job hoppers, and HR staff have always had trouble with resumes that showed a progression of 1 to 2 year stays at companies. That's been there for as long as I remember. 

What I think is different is that it has always been recognized (by everyone, job seeker, recruiter, HR staff, managers) as bad behavior (especially for those "looking,") Today, the millennial job seeker doesn't recognize this. They see it as normal and THAT's the issue.

Dave

Dave Jensen, Founder and Moderator
Bio Careers Forum


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2